Screen Shot 2016-06-12 at 5.42.19 PM

Great White Mystery

for National Geographic
Published: June 2016


Thanks to Jaws, they're the ocean's most iconic and feared fish. But we know surprisingly little about them.
12107750_10153529400101747_7497568894685038332_n

Story Collider: Is This Biology?


In October 2015, I appeared with Story Collider to talk about porcupines, Satan worshippers, and biology.

Screen Shot 2016-04-19 at 10.34.38 AM

Story Collider: The Biology of Pig Shit



In early 2016 I tell a story onstage about the chemistry of pig manure.
Screen Shot 2015-12-08 at 1.07.50 PM

Nieman Storyboard: “Scientists are quirky everywhere”

for Nieman Storyboard
Published: December 2015


Biologist-turned-journalist Erik Vance on incorporating science into narrative stories
SIS2012_logo_RGB_0

NASW Science in Society Winner, 2015



For the Discover magazine feature "Why Nothing Works"
Copyright Dominic Bracco II

Feeding the Billions

for Scientific American
Published: April 2015


How a small group of visionaries are trying to feed China—and save the world's oceans.
Vespula vulgaris

Manifesto of a Wasp Scientist

for The Last Word on Nothing

All characters in this essay are fictional and should not be confused with real scientists. I ask that no bee researcher take offense.
Screen Shot 2015-05-28 at 11.51.29 AM

Hugh and the Boobies

for Hakai Magazine
Published: April 22, 2015


Like characters in a soap opera, boobies on a remote Mexican island cheat, kill, and jostle for power.
Copyright Dominic Bracco II

An Ocean Apart

for Virginia Quarterly Review
Published: Spring 2015


Can two forces threatening the sustainability of sharks—the fishermen of Mexico and consumers in China—help the fish survive?
MayaNG

Losing Maya Heritage to Looters

for National Geographic
Published: August 8, 2014


Stolen artifacts are making it from the Guatemalan jungle to wealthy black-market buyers.
placebo-brain

Why Nothing Works

for Discover
Published: July 2014


Once dismissed as a psychological curiosity, the placebo effect is now recognized as the key to the brain’s “inner pharmacy.” If only doctors knew how to open the medicine cabinet.